Posts Tagged ‘new media’

bliptvBreaking new media news this week, Blip.tv has unveiled innovative partnerships that will possibly shake the new media scene.

For the past year Blip.tv has been quite silent because they have been developing a massive integration deal with hosting platforms such as YouTube, Vimeo and many other sites.

The integrations will be for syndication, advertising and perhaps much more. News is that this deal will offer producers to syndicate videos directly to sites.

This is a financial breakthrough for Blip.tv, seeing that we’re in a recession. They can now also sell ads on the videos. The way they do it is that they embed ads into the shows and split the revenue with revenue share. Now this maybe a possible business model for both video and advertising companies.

BlipTVs Mike Hudack

BlipTVs Mike Hudack

Blip.tv’s CEO Mike Hudack said at the press conference that Blip.tv was designed “to make independent Web shows sustainable”.

It will run its own hosting platform and simultaneously let members upload to many other platforms. This allows for optional advertising programmes that split 50-50 with show creators revenue earned.

There are more speculations that Blip.tv will also be integrating with Roku quite soon. Roku, is a device that converts web videos to television sets. This connects directly to live streaming which audiences from all over can see. If they ever want to embed the coding, they can do so and it can go directly to their blog.

But where does this leave YouTube?

youtubeIt’s been well-documented that our dear friend YouTube has had a serious profit problem…Therefore they have been trying to get all sorts of tricks in order to generate revenue, they’ve experimented with brand sponsorship, user-generated homepage ads and brand placement advertising but alas, it was in vain.

However, their attempt of announcing a beta trial test with FreeWheel, a company that specializes in online video advertising, has saved them.

This venture will give them, from a content generator perspective, the freedom to choose the ideal ad format and platform – making monetization easier.

Will it truly save our dear friend YouTube? I think their partnership with Blip.tv is not a bad deal, their website has so much more than YouTube.

Blip.tv gets more points than YouTube

Not only is Blip.tv a thousand times cooler, it beats YouTube by far with these small adjusts which news organisations can use effectively to market their multimedia products. I gathered the top five points which I like about Blip.tv.

* Youtube lets you upload videos only in standard formats like the Windows AVI, MOV or the MPEG format. Blip.tv practically supports all video formats including the popular Flash Video (flv) format.

*Youtube imposes a 10 minute or 100 MB restriction on files sizes but blip.tv has no such limitation.

*Blip.tv, allows you to download videos. They also allow you download videos in the original format with the same quality – just right click the video link and choose save as.

*Blip.tv provides detailed stats about your videos including how visitors found your video, what format they preferred and where did they watch it.

*Finally videos uploaded on Youtube are automatically compressed and resized to the 320×240 format. Blip.tv maintains the original quality of the video and they do not resize the video clips. They encourage content owners to upload different formats of the same video suitable for downloading, watching on the internet or on cellphones.

Blip.tv definitely scores more points because it generates automatic feed enclosures for you RSS feeds. And wait, there is one more fact, one can upload videos to blip.tv via FTP.

Go, give it a shot. I dare you. This is just a testament of what is in store in the new media scene.

Corrections

Updated 3rd August 2009:

After writing this post I realised that I missed the point completely. In fact, Youtube’s teaming with Freewheel has far more significant implications in terms of future strategies for monetisation and targeting of online video
advertising.

The truth is Blip.tv is not competition to Youtube, nor would I think it aspires to be. Like other online video channels (Hulu, Justin.tv, Brightcove, Vimeo) each attempts to provide its own unique service – generally as free or paid for video host with add-ons.

Youtube is the ‘mass’ platform. Blip.tv is a quasi-professional platform for producers who want to produce their serialised content or online shows. Youtube  also has a section for independent producer shows (and now also movies and commercially produced series). But this is only one of the things Youtube does.

I made  judgement calls about services which I have never personally used. For this I apologies profusely and apologies for getting my facts wrong.

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little-pig1

I found it impossible to escape the news about Swine flu, now called H1N1 influenza A as I pondered what to blog, it’s on everyone’s minds, lips, tweets,  and status updates…

According to World Health Organisation (WHO) as of 06:00 GMT, 5 May 2009, 21 countries have officially reported 1124 cases of influenza A (H1N1) infection. Mexico has reported 25 deaths and United States has reported one death. How does this link to the blog? Well, the H1N1 flu virus is too being rapidly spread through the social networking and media wires.

Yet this is not the first time the internet has been the one-stop shop for news scoops. Twitter has emerged as a source for major breaking news stories. Like the earthquake that devastated the Sichuan region of China, tweets from the disaster zone gave the rest of the world its first glimpse of the scope of the devastation. Again we saw how social network sites took the forefront when  there were media events that were driven by the web 2.0 e.g Mumbai terror attacks, plane crash in Hudson river etc.

Over the plethora of social networking websites, people from all sorts of backgrounds are blogging, twittering, facebooking and myspacing about the flu virus. Twitter has once again gained media attention as a source of fervent ‘swine’ flu discussion, it’s become the top trending topic on Twitter, with users rapidly tweeting about the latest (Twitter even topped out at a rate of more than 10,000 tweets per hour earlier during the course of last week).

Yes granted many ‘swine’ flu updates were making crude jokes, like SA’s own advertising upcoming guru Khaya Dlanga’s tweet updates, “Swine flu my ass, I’ll bring my mighty vengeance & furious anger upon these pigs. Had bacon for breakfast. For lunch, something with pig” or “If I hear one more thing about Swine flu I’ll go eat a pig”.

This proves that social networking sites can be as misleading, however a significant portion of the discussions about the flu seemed to centre around a legitimate desire to connect with others and talk about real issues. This created a some what tight knit community that wanted to speak about what is happening in the world.

New media vs old media

Google Trends reports that “Swine Flu Ohio” is the 27th most popular search keyword currently, with searches for “Swine Flu Symptoms” also making the top 100 keyword searches on Google.

google-trends

Google Maps have also been created to chart the spread of the Swine Flu. Below is a Google Map created by a bio medical engineer, this charts suspect and confirmed cases of the Swine Flu in the U.S. and Mexico.

h1n1-swine-flu-google-maps

Technorati has graphed the number of times the term was used in blog posts and it shows that the mention of Swine Flu rose sharply from Friday to nearly 2800 blog post demonstrates.

This for me, shows the power of the internet but most importantly the power of social networking and media sites. People from every corner of the globe are conversing about something that doesn’t affect them directly however it now part of their community discussions. These new media tools have gone beyond reporting on a particular story to what people want to say about particular issues. Now it is and it is creating some independence and democracy with audiences.

Granted only a few people have internet access to the but  the minority engage instanteously with the rest of the world. And in this case new media tools helped to support and deliver public health messages quickly and broadly and how to track such viruses.

Old media in trouble?

However, I think  the role of new media may overshadow traditional journalism and it can cause a form of tension in newsrooms because now journalists are trusting social network sites for scoops in the land of social media.

New media tools have become the new hybrid form of journalism, they are quick and everywhere on the web unlike traditional forms of journalism.

So is the traditional notion and value of hard core journalism being apprehended?

I think not, social netowrking and media sites can be complementary to old media. They just need to verify facts. Journalism and new media tools need each other to inform and educate the world. In the future when more outbreaks such as swine flu occur social media can help out traditional journalism. Futureye signing out.

Related link:

http://www.stuff.co.nz/opinion/2385466/Swine-flu-story-a-media-beat-up

Blog last updated and corrected on the  27th May 2009

 

Ok so to blog or not to blog? Well I have no choice actually…It’s part of my new media course at Rhodes University. My topic is future watch and the blog title is Futureye. Initially I wanted to go with ifuture but it was taken so I’ll just stick with this one.

Ok enough of the nervous chit chat… I’m getting ready to post my first expert post, it’s not as easy as Jude says it is and I’m still not sure what to write about exactly, oh Jude is my lecturer just in case you wondering.  But I have a lot of plans for this blogs and I hope I get time to implement them all.

 For the next two terms we, the new media class, need to produce a posts that show a great deal of reading and they’ll be marked by an external examiner. No pressure (I’m so nervous) hey… Well I hope my post due tomorrow comes out as a thoroughly thought through post-cross fingers everybody.

Oh before I go I thought I should share this quote with you guys by Alexander Clark: “Let us watch well our beginnings, and results will manage themselves”. I think it’s self explanatory… cheers for now.